Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Clinical and Counseling Psychology Singapore.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Marissa C. Esperal

Southern Luzon State University, Philippines

Keynote: The meaning of a master therapist: Filipino clinical practitioners’ perpective

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Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marissa C. Esperal photo
Biography:

The presenter is a graduate of Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Southern Luzon Polytechnic College (now Southern Luzon State University) which is located in her hometown. She finished her first master's degree, Master of Arts in Education with specialization in Guidance and Counseling at the Philippine Normal University in Manila in 2003. She was awarded her second master's degree, Master of Arts in Psychology by the University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City in 2010 and a Ph. D in Psychology by the same university in 2011. Mariz (as she is often called) is a registered psychologist and a registered guidance counselor. Currently, she serves as the Vice-President for Academic Affairs in Southern Luzon State University in Lucban, Quezon, Philippines.

Abstract:

This two-phase study attempted to understand the meaning of a master therapist based on the perspective of two groups of selected Filipino clinical practitioners: the master psychotherapist group and their fellow professionals in the field of Psychology. A preliminary survey was conducted first to determine the master psychotherapist group; and then, to determine how fellow practitioners define a master therapist. A qualitative interview making use of digital recorder was then conducted to determine how the master psychotherapist group defines a master therapist. Data was analyzed using the Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Findings revealed that both the master psychotherapist group and their fellow practitioners in the field of Psychology perceive a master therapist in bifurcated terms. The meanings associated with being a master therapist focused more on qualities and skills which are usually developed through education and specialized trainings, but have had its foundation in childhood particularly in relation to family upbringing. Certain expectations based on profession significantly influenced the way fellow professionals described a master psychotherapist. It was concluded that fellow professionals define a master psychotherapist in the light of his/her professional and personal attributes. Moreover, master therapists are those persons born with the natural inclination to develop the attributes of a therapist and who were later nurtured by a supportive environment. Recommendations for the professionalization, contextualization and promotion of clinical practice of psychotherapy in the Philippines were emphasized.

Keynote Forum

Adrian Low

California Southern University, USA

Keynote: The Effects of Hong Kong Employees’ Workplace Stress on Heart Rate Variability

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Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Adrian Low  photo
Biography:

Adrian Low has completed his PsyD from California Southern University. Dr. Adrian Low is the president of Hong Kong Association of Psychology as well as the Research director of Aditgo Ltd, a learning and research center in Hong Kong. Dr. Low is also a Heartmath’s certified practioner. He has also started the Mindfulness Psychology Coaching movement in Asia with the mission of bringing everybody to the present moment. Dr. Low’s dissertation was of a workplace stress related nature, which was the first research that utilized biofeedback devices in a large corporation situated in Hong Kong China.

Abstract:

Research on workplace stress measurements varied without much accuracy and effectiveness. The objective of this study was to introduce a new quantitative assessment tool emWave Pro Plus (Institute of HeartMath) and to compare Heart Rate Variability (HRV) results with the Personal and Organizational Quality Assessment (POQA) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Eighty-five full-time employees who were working at least 40 hours per week in a large corporation participated in this study. Firstly, significant negative correlations were found between Subjective Stress and HRV measures: Perceived Stress and 5-minute Mean Inter-Beat-Interval (IBI), r = -0.217*; Perceived stress and 5min SDNN, r = -0.255* and Perceived stress and Ln 5min RMSSD, r = -0.282**. Secondly, significant negative correlations were found between age and the HRV measures: 1- minute SDNN (r = -.235, p < 0.01); 5-minute SDNN (r = -.290, p < 0.01); 5-minute RMSSD (r = - .395, p < 0.01); Total Power (r = -.272, p < 0.05); Very Low Frequency (r = -.215, p < 0.05) and High Frequency (r = -.402, p < 0.01). Thirdly, significant negative correlation was found between Normalized Coherence and Relational Tension (r = -.222, p < 0.05). Additionally, significant positive correlations were found between Emotional Stress and the Mean Heart Rate Range (MHRR), r = 0.216* and between Intention to Quit and 5-minute Ln Very Low Frequency (VLF), r = 0.234*. The research shows promising results and future studies should continue to tap into HRV as an objective measure of mental health and workplace stress.

Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aileen Pidgeon photo
Biography:

Aileen Pidgeon, PhD (Clin) is an Assistant Professor Psychology at Bond University, co-Chair 4th Year Bond Psychology Programs, co-Director of the Mindfulness Resilience Wellness Centre and a board registered Clinical Psychologist. Dr Pidgeon's widely published research identifies innovative ways to reveal the full transformative potential of mindfulness training. In recent years, the main focus of Dr Pidgeon’s research is determining the optimal ways to integrate mindfulness into universities to improve psychological well-being and resilience in university students. At Bond University, Dr Pidgeon has led a research team to develop the evidence-based Mindfulness Awareness Resilience Skills Training (MARST) program, which includes a mental health application. She also designs and teaches research-based mindfulness retreats and workshops on the science and practice of mindfulness. She has also led training, workshops and retreats to promote the psychological health and wellbeing in the community. Dr Pidgeon sits on a number of boards and advisory groups in the field of education and research.

 

Abstract:

For over a decade, the psychological treatment of mental health issues has been undergoing a fundamental change. This change has been largely driven by the continued significant unmet need for mental health services and the availability of digital technology such as the internet and mobile devices. Individuals around the world are becoming increasingly dependent on the internet to obtain information and interact with services, due to flexibility, convenience, choice, cost and time savings. This dependence is becoming more evident as individuals seeking mental health information and support report preferring to access services online rather than face-to-face services. The field of mobile mental health (“m-Health”) is evolving rapidly with an unprecedented growth of psychological tools on the market including preventive and therapeutic interventions. M-Health applications offer the opportunity for mental healthcare delivery anytime and anywhere overcoming geographical, time based organizational barriers with low and affordable costs. M-Health applications can be used as a bridge between face-to-face therapy sessions, improve adherence to out of therapy activities while promoting patient autonomy. Given the ever increasing demands and limited supply of mental health services, coupled with barriers to care including a patient’s desire for anonymity, indirect financial costs and impaired access to mental health services, the use of apps could promote mental health service efficiency as well as supporting the mental health system to achieve the promise of providing equal access for equal need. The challenge that psychology faces with the rapid increase of m-health applications is the availability of low-quality applications with a lack of an underlying evidence base, a lack of scientific credibility and limited clinical effectiveness. M-health application designers are rarely clinical or counselling psychologists and if they were, there would be better accuracy of the content with evidence to support the efficacy of the application. The barriers for psychologists designing m-health applications are typically a lack of technical skills and time. This paper will discuss the growing need for clinical and counselling psychologists to shift their philosophy—from seeing what happens— to a prioritisation of designing and evaluating m-health applications in the provision of high quality clinical services to patients.  

Keynote Forum

Olga Bogdashina

International Autism Institute, United Kingdom

Keynote: A Reconstruction of the Sensory World of Autism

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Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Olga Bogdashina photo
Biography:

Olga Bogdashina, Ph.D. (linguistics), MSc (Psychology), MA (Teaching methods) MA Ed (Autism), Honorary Professor, Honorary Doctor, KSPU, Co-founder of the International Autism Institute, and Programme Leader (Autism courses), Chief Research Fellow and Lecturer at the International Autism Institute, KSPU; Visiting lecturer in Autism Studies, co-founder of the International Consortium of Autism Institutes, Author of nine books (some are translated into 13 languages) that reflect her specific interest in autism research sensory perception, cognitive functioning, communication and language development in autism, and spirituality in autism – reflected in the books, including: - Sensory perceptual Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Different sensory experiences – different perceptual worlds (2016). 2nd (revised) edition, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers; - Communication Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Do we speak the same language?. London: JKP; - Theory of Mind and the Triad of Perspectives on Autism and Asperger Syndrome: A view from the bridge. London: JKP; - Autism and the Edges of the Known World: Sensitivities, Language and Constructed Reality London: JKP. - Autism and Spirituality: Psyche, Self and Spirit in People on the Autism Spectrum. London: JKP. Olga teaches and lectures in the UK, Europe, & Mexico. She has a son (30) with classic autism and a daughter (27) with Asperger syndrome.

Abstract:

The real world and the perceived world (i.e., our mental image of the world) differ. Though we live in the same physical world and deal with the same ‘raw material’, differences in sensory functioning create invisible walls between autistic and non-autistic people. The metaphorical descriptions of children and adults with autism, such as ‘aliens’, ‘Martians’ - become factual! They do live in a different world! The same stimuli look, sound, feel, smell differently for them. When we want to show our love and affection by hugging the child, he pulls away as the pain from the touch is unbearable. So what is our interpretation? - ‘He doesn’t love me.” We are often ‘deaf’ to the sounds our child cannot tolerate (for instance, sounds of fans working, kettle boiling). We are ‘blind’ to a 60-cycle flickering of fluorescent lights that makes the room pulsate on and off. Just because we are ‘deaf/blind/dumb, etc.’ to the stimuli our little ‘aliens’ perceive with extreme acuteness, we describe their behaviours as bizarre, odd, inappropriate. However, as the systems work differently their responses to sensory stimuli are ‘normal’ (from autistic point of view), though different and unconventional for us, living in a parallel world.

As some sensory differences are present in all individuals with autism it would benefit parents of autistic children and professionals working with them to become more knowledgeable about the sensory perceptual problems they experience and possible ways to help them. Autistic children literally live in a parallel (differently constructed) world and are often misunderstood (= mistreated). Many behaviours that interfere with learning and social interaction are, in fact, protective or sensory defensive responses of the child to ‘sensory pollution’ in the environment.

It is crucial to understand how the qualitative differences of sensory perception associated with autism affect each particular child. What is intolerable about the child’s behaviour is that it seems meaningless. If we can understand the reason for this behaviour it doesn’t seem strange or disturbing any more. This brings acceptance and respect for the autistic person’s efforts to ‘make sense’ of the world.

As all the senses are integrated, the deficiency in one may lead to disturbances in the other(s). It is, therefore, necessary to find out which sense(s) and to what extent is deficient, and which senses can ‘be relied on’.

The environment may either speed up the development or hinder it. In order to help them, we need to know how the senses of each individual work and what (voluntary and involuntary) strategies each individual has acquired to function in the environment. This reconstruction of the sensory world of autism will give us some ideas of the way autistic people perceive the world and will make non-autistics understand that the way they see the environment is not necessarily the only way to see it.

Besides, better understanding of sensory processing in autism will assist in improving diag­nostic instruments (including diagnosis in very young children) and distinguishing sensory perceptual subtypes of autis­tic individuals and provide appropri­ate choices of help needed by each particular individual.