Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Clinical and Counseling Psychology Singapore.

Day 2 :

Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jaime Senabre photo
Biography:

Jaime Senabre. Degree in Psychology and Master in Psychopathology and Health. He completed doctoral studies in the Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment of the UNED, related to Stress and the Immune System, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Moobing. Chief of Brigade in the Forest Fire Service of the Generalitat Valenciana, with more than 20 years of experience. With multidisciplinary training at the Master's level in areas such as: Occupational Health and Safety, Emergency Management, Sport Psychology, Human Resources Management, Mediation, Conflict Resolution and Coaching. Postgraduate in Environmental Consulting and Criminology. As a psychologist, he collaborates with several companies and institutions in the area of training in Psychology in Emergencies and Human Resources management. He is Professor at the University of Valencia in the Master in "Intervention and operational coordination in emergencies and catastrophes" and Diploma of University Specialization in "Instructor in Emergency Operations Services", among others. He is Director and President of the International Scientific-Professional Committee of the National Symposium on Forest Fires (SINIF). He has given numerous conferences at international level and has been part of the Organizing Committee of several International Congresses. He is part of the Editorial Board of several international scientific journals. He has published numerous articles on forest fires, stress, psychosocial risks and emotional trauma, mainly in relation to emergency services and natural disasters. Currently, he is assigned to the Research Group in "Climate and Territorial Planning" (Department of Regional Geographical Analysis and Physical Geography) of the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters of the University of Alicante, where he researches on the Social Perception of Forest Fire Risk and Conduct to possible Disasters. He is a member of the Spanish Society for the Study of Anxiety and Stress (SEAS), and the Spanish Association of Clinical Psychology and Psychopathology (AEPCP).

Abstract:

The Forest Fire Extinguishing Services sometimes face critical situations that can suppose a traumatic experience capable of generating a deep discomfort in the interveners, such as the loss of companions during the work of extinction, burns caused by the fire, the emotional impact in situations of entrapment, etc.This type of negative events can provoke fear and feelings of terror in the victims, as well as invisible emotional scars, difficult to erase and of complex approach.An inadequate assistance to this type of professionals, affected by a critical incident of these characteristics, can originate various processes of victimization, causing a psychological damage characterized by: pain, anger, indignation, guilt, fear, awe, intense reexperimentation of what was lived,physiological and psychological hyperactivation, apathy, helplessness, feeling of loss of control, insecurity and avoidance behaviors.The absence of empathy and sensitivity of the staff that attends to the victims, together with a lack of information and a mismatch between the expected and received treatment, can cause a negative feeling in the firefighters affected by the traumatic incident, capable of initiating a process of revictimization called: second victimization.In this work, concepts such as traumatic experience, traumatic event, psychological damage and second victimization are addressed. Likewise, the conditioning factors of the emotional impact (external and internal), the objectives of the psychological help work and the basic skills to develop it are pointed out. Also, the phases through which the forest firefighters go when they suffer a revictimization are indicated.Finally, some guidelines are offered on "what to do" to avoid a second victimization.
Key notes: Revictimization, post-traumatic stress, critical incident, wildland firefighters, forest fire.

Keynote Forum

Elena Baixauli

University of Valencia, Spain

Keynote: Unhappiness
Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elena Baixauli photo
Biography:

Elena Baixauli Gallego has dedicated twenty years to staff development as a Psychologist in the field of health and as a mediator. She is currently working as an Associate Professor, Faculty of Psychology in the department of Personality at University of Valencia. She is involved in various activities such as therapy for children and adults, family and business mediation and delivery of lectures and workshops. She is the author of “Business conflict: A guide to provide solutions”. She is a Member of the International Forum of Mediators, the World International Mediation, a Member of the Delegation of the World Forum of Mediation in the City of Valencia, Member of Entrepreneurs from the University of Valencia and the University of Salamanca. She is also a speaker and author of several books and publications on mediation.

Abstract:

Dopamine is a hormone associated with happiness and serotonin regulates our mood. When a person is physically attracted to another, an activation of dopamine, serotonin increased and production ofoxytocin, a hormone that reduces pain perception and increases the emotional connection we have with the other occurs. Disconnecting the amygdala, the part of the brain that are active against negative emotions like fear. The combination of all these elements leads to crush the other. After our beliefs, the way we understand ourselves and understand the world around us, eventually determining if I made a good choice. These are questions necessary to understand the functioning of our brain and human relations. Maybe if we are able to answer these questions we can prevent many interpersonal conflicts. All to indicate that it is not, perhaps a cultural thing, something we have learned. I mean, throughout history we have learned that the best defense is attack, then our amygdala is always on, then it is easier to move quickly to negative emotions.

  • Clinical Psychology

Session Introduction

Alexandra Trofimova

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia

Title: Aspects of emotional sphere and cognitive functions of people with spinal cord injury
Speaker
Biography:

Trofimova A.K. PhD student, Chair of psychophysiology, Department of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Abstract:

Traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) dramatically changes the course of a person's life.  The prevalence of this phenomenon in the world is 40-80 cases per million inhabitants per year. Patients with traumatic spinal cord injury become lifelong invalids in need of constant complex medical and social rehabilitation, which the most important aspect is a long-term psychological correction.

The aim of the study is to diagnose changes in the emotional and cognitive spheres of patients with spinal cord trauma.

Materials and methods. The study included 119 patients with TSCI at cervical (41.2%) or thoracic (58.8%) levels of the spine, aged 18 to 45 years, prescription of injury 0.5-38 years.

All patients underwent a comprehensive psychological examination, including a scale of Beck depression, a scale of self-esteem. Spielberg and Yu.L. Khanina, the method of N. Hall to determine the level of emotional intelligence, the hospital scale of anxiety and depression (HADS), the viability test by S. Muddy. The battery of cognitive tests by A.R. Luria.

Results. Mild and severe depression was diagnosed in 42.9% of disabled people; the predominance of personal anxiety over the reactive. Severe and mild depression is more often detected in patients with cervical injury, anxiety - thoracic.

In patients with TSCI, self-regulation, strong-willed regulation, emotional intelligence and involvement are highly developed, against the background of decreased affective control and lack of emotional flexibility. The cognitive sphere in persons with disabilities with TSCI predominantly corresponds to normative data.

Speaker
Biography:

Kenneth Wee graduated from Nanyang Technological University with a First Class Honours degree in Psychology. He is currently working as a Human Resources Consultant. Prior to his current position, he was a psychologist with the Republic of Singapore Air Force for more than two years, where he rendered counselling, performance coaching and organisational consulting services to airmen. 

Abstract:

Modern military aviation is progressively undertaken by remotely piloted aircrafts (i.e. drones). While there has been a plethora of military research that illustrates the workplace stressors faced by manned aircraft pilots and other military professionals, research on drone pilots has been relatively scarce. Given that drone pilots face circumstances of extended operations, perpetual deployment, frequent shift changes and daily transitions between household and operational demands, it is thus unsurprising that they might be at a risk of fatigue and mental health issues. A review of current literature revealed that although drone pilots experience combat far from their intended targets, they still face mental health issues such as depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder at similar incidence rates as those of manned aircraft pilots. While engagement in warfare does not seem to be a significant contributing factor to workplace stress, other factors such as inadequate manpower staffing, long hours and additional administrative duties predicted a greater likelihood of mental health problems. Such stressors could be argued to stem from a main factor of a lack of combat compartmentalisation, in which drone pilots are expected to continuously juggle operational and household demands. The findings highlight the need to understand the workplace stressors that drone pilots face and to recognise that drone pilots possess a similar mental health risk as manned aircraft pilots. Given the unique workplace demands exacted on drone pilots, further research is needed to inform the clinical interventions that might best benefit drone pilots with mental health issues.

Speaker
Biography:

Fomina K. A. Student, Chair of Neuropsychology and Abnormal Psychology, Department of Psychology, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Abstract:

Clinical psychology doesn’t have any developed methodology of experiments and tools for research of the depression on consciousness after stroke.

Сonsciousness is intentional, that is, it is always "consciousness about ..."; which means it is transphenomenal. Thus, consciousness manifests itself only in when it encounters with “the other”, receiving an “objection” back from it. This "other" must become "opaque" to consciousness. In order to highlight the manifestations of consciousness, it is necessary to create a situation of awareness of something. Strictly speaking the only phenomenon of consciousness is the phenomenon of a body understood in the broadest sense of "translucent" reality (both objectified, i.e. demonstrating resistance, and subjectified, i.e. allowing control). Techniques to maintain functional systems of the psyche in the "working state" can be based on a multimodal sensory stimulation, since perception processes, like other cognitive processes, are not the sum of operations, but rather an active process of interaction with the environment, during which the subject itself is transformed. If stimuli are used to induce non-positive emotions (for example, a sense of pain) associated with life support functions, then one must begin to look for ways to avoid such experiences. The choice of emotionally neutral, negative or positive stimuli can be determined by the degree of the depression of consciousness, which requires experimental studies specially aimed at that. Issues related to the intensity, duration and frequency of impacts also remain so far unresolved.

Speaker
Biography:

Pooja Rai is pursuing Ph.D. from Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, under the supervision of Prof. Indramani. L. Singh on the topic "Attentional deficits in persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Healthy Aging". She has been working on dementia patients since 3 years and have seen approx. 50 patients of dementia during this course of study. She is working with several neurologists. She has published 4 of her papers in her Ph.D course. She has been awarded as B.H.U. Gold medalist for two times in her academic history for securing highest marks in Masters in Psychology and Bachelor’s in Psychology respectively. Besides doing Ph.D. and a UGC JRF itself, She is also working on a project on Alzheimer's sponsored by Cognitive Science Research Initiative, Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Science and Technology, New Delhi.

Abstract:

Attention has been found to be an important predictor of overall ADL scores in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Attentional deficit is progressively acknowledged as an important cognitive symptom in Dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). DAT affects people's cognitive ability to perform activities of daily living is often referred to as functional ability and as a measurement of disability, initially in complex activities but progressing to more basic activities such as the ability to cope with dressing and toileting later in the disease course. The neuropathological basis of these attentional deficits remains unsettled, with two competing hypotheses: spread of pathology from the medial temporal to basal forebrain structures versus corticocortical tract disconnection. Moreover, it is still not clear whether improving attention could improve ADL performance, and the present study purports to assess the relationship between attentional dysfunction and the ability to perform everyday life activities. We used the Informant interview using the 11-item Everyday Abilities Scale for India (EASI) to assess evidence for functional limitation in activities of daily living (ADL). Pearson corrletion coefficient were calculated between activities of dily living and Mini-Mental State Examination(MMSE) scores. The result shows that among all the cognitive domain, attention domain of MMSE was the most predicative of EASI followed by visuospatial, language and delayed recall. So, in sum the study suggested that improving attention could improve ADL performances in MCI and DAT patients.

  • Counseling Psychology
Speaker
Biography:

Arikelola has completed her PhD at the age of 52 from University of Jos Nigeriashe is a chief lrcturer at kaduna Polytechnic in the department of Education Technical and the departmental counsellor. She is a prominent member of couselling association of  Nigeria and Kaduna state. She has authored  many books on counselling and primary education.she has published  more than 30 papers in both local and international journals and belongs to other local and international asssociations such as American Psychological Science (APS) and Nigeria National Teachers Council.

Abstract:

Recently many challenges have befallen Kaduna metropolis which include, kidnapping, high terrorism and insecurity masterminded by youths from homes and families within the metropolis. Many advice have been sought from elders, parents, psychologies and counselors with more knowledge, insights or experience since the belief is that the rising rate of this social crimes have root in defective family system and lifestyles which have produced anti-social beings. One way to minimize the increasing rate of social crimes is to seek the services of a school based family counselor, however, the constraint to school based family counselling may hinder the school based family counsellor useless in rendering his/her services. Guided by three research questions, the study adopted, the survey design method. A  population of 240 made up of both private and government school counsellors and career masters were randomly sampled, the research instrument titled “constraint to school based family counseling services in school” was developed and used by the researcher. Data generated were analyzed using simple percentages, mean scores and pie chart. Findings reveal many schools have no knowledge of school based family counseling and its services and serious opposition from school counselors to school based family counselors. Recommendation include inclusion if school based family counselling into tertiary school course contents and creating of awareness on its values in minimizing high rate of social crimes in the metropolis.key word:school based family counselling, social crimes

  • Family Systems Therapy or Family Therapy
Speaker
Biography:

Sayed Jafar Ahmadi has completed his PhD at the age of 36 years from University of Isfahan School of Psuchology. He is the senior  theqnical advisor of research fundation in huter callage, City University of New York (partnership of kabul and Herat University).. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of Kateb Quarterly.

Abstract:

Suicide and self-immolation are the most prevalent problem among Afghan Women. Suicide and suicidal thoughts are related to several factors. This study is carried out in order to identify the relationship among suicidal thoughts, conflicts, and domestic-violence and some demographic variables. To carry out the study correlation, 384 women from five Kabul’s clusters, the center, north, south, east, and west, were selected. Then husband and wife-conflicts, domestic-violence, and suicidal thoughts evaluation questionnaires were distribute to them and the collected data was analyzed by SPSS. Pearson Coefficient and T Student resulted family factors (decrease in couples’ cooperation, sexual relationship decline, emotional reactions increase, family and relatives relationship decline, increase in gaining children’s support, personal relationship increase and financial separation between couples, and domestic-violence scale too, have significant relationship with suicidal thoughts in Afghan women). In addition, suicidal thoughts rate in forced-marriages and family-type were observed by T Student resulting far significant suicidal thoughts in force-marriages and extended-families. Can say that usually, due to extended relationship, desires and demands, ideas and different values, and forced-marriages, in big families, violence rate is  high  and suicidal thoughts in women are too much.

Key Words: Suicidal thoughts, Family Conflicts, Domestic Violence, Afghan Women and Forced Marriage.

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Session Introduction

Jiyeong Ha

Yonsei University, Korea

Title: The effect of spatiotemporal continuity on face perception
Speaker
Biography:

Jiyeong is a second-year graduate student in Cognitive Neuroscience Lab (P.I., Do-Joon Yi) at Yonsei university. Her research focuses on viewpoint-invariant object recognition. Specifically, her work aims to explore the mid-level process between perception and cognition and to find what perceptual features are mostly used to form abstract representations of objects.

Abstract:

The visual system has little trouble recognizing a person even though the retinal image of that person’s face keeps chainging due to expression, illumination, distance, etc. One of the strategies to maintain such stable object representations is considering spatiotemporal continuity of the object with its visual properties. Spatiotemporally connected objects are likely to be considered as the same object despite having different physical appearances. Conversely, if one perceives spatiotemporally separated objects, it is natural to infer them as two different objects even if they look identical. We sought to investigate the effects of spatiotemporal continuity on facial perception.  In each trial, participants were instructed to observe two objects moving in opposite directions across the screen. The objects started as scrambled faces, and turned into intact faces when they reached a fixation. The two faces appeared sequentially. They were the same or different (repeated vs. unrepeated), and they appeared within a single stream or across two different streams (continuous vs. discontinuous). Once the movement ended, participants determined whether the two faces were the same or different. To investigate the effects of spatiotemporal continuity on face perception, we calculated hit and false alarm rates from the repeated and unrepeated conditions, respectively. The results showed that the sensitivity (d’) of the continuous condition was significantly lower than that of the discontinuous condition, but the response criteria (k) for the two conditions were not different. Also, hit rate for repeated faces were lower in the continuous condition than in the discontinuous condition, indicating that repeated faces were more difficult to detect in the same stream than in different streams. Such impaired face identification might be attributed to the failure of token separation under the influence of spatiotemporal continuity. The current findings suggest that spatiotemporal continuity might be utilized as a cue for stable face representations by modulating the process in which perceptual evidence is extracted.