Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Clinical and Counseling Psychology Singapore.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Marissa C. Esperal

Southern Luzon State University, Philippines

Keynote: The meaning of a master therapist: Filipino clinical practitioners’ perpective

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Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marissa C. Esperal photo
Biography:

The presenter is a graduate of Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Southern Luzon Polytechnic College (now Southern Luzon State University) which is located in her hometown. She finished her first master's degree, Master of Arts in Education with specialization in Guidance and Counseling at the Philippine Normal University in Manila in 2003. She was awarded her second master's degree, Master of Arts in Psychology by the University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City in 2010 and a Ph. D in Psychology by the same university in 2011. Mariz (as she is often called) is a registered psychologist and a registered guidance counselor. Currently, she serves as the Vice-President for Academic Affairs in Southern Luzon State University in Lucban, Quezon, Philippines.

Abstract:

This two-phase study attempted to understand the meaning of a master therapist based on the perspective of two groups of selected Filipino clinical practitioners: the master psychotherapist group and their fellow professionals in the field of Psychology. A preliminary survey was conducted first to determine the master psychotherapist group; and then, to determine how fellow practitioners define a master therapist. A qualitative interview making use of digital recorder was then conducted to determine how the master psychotherapist group defines a master therapist. Data was analyzed using the Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Findings revealed that both the master psychotherapist group and their fellow practitioners in the field of Psychology perceive a master therapist in bifurcated terms. The meanings associated with being a master therapist focused more on qualities and skills which are usually developed through education and specialized trainings, but have had its foundation in childhood particularly in relation to family upbringing. Certain expectations based on profession significantly influenced the way fellow professionals described a master psychotherapist. It was concluded that fellow professionals define a master psychotherapist in the light of his/her professional and personal attributes. Moreover, master therapists are those persons born with the natural inclination to develop the attributes of a therapist and who were later nurtured by a supportive environment. Recommendations for the professionalization, contextualization and promotion of clinical practice of psychotherapy in the Philippines were emphasized.

Keynote Forum

Adrian Low

California Southern University, USA

Keynote: The Effects of Hong Kong Employees’ Workplace Stress on Heart Rate Variability

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Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Adrian Low  photo
Biography:

Adrian Low has completed his PsyD from California Southern University. Dr. Adrian Low is the president of Hong Kong Association of Psychology as well as the Research director of Aditgo Ltd, a learning and research center in Hong Kong. Dr. Low is also a Heartmath’s certified practioner. He has also started the Mindfulness Psychology Coaching movement in Asia with the mission of bringing everybody to the present moment. Dr. Low’s dissertation was of a workplace stress related nature, which was the first research that utilized biofeedback devices in a large corporation situated in Hong Kong China.

Abstract:

Research on workplace stress measurements varied without much accuracy and effectiveness. The objective of this study was to introduce a new quantitative assessment tool emWave Pro Plus (Institute of HeartMath) and to compare Heart Rate Variability (HRV) results with the Personal and Organizational Quality Assessment (POQA) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Eighty-five full-time employees who were working at least 40 hours per week in a large corporation participated in this study. Firstly, significant negative correlations were found between Subjective Stress and HRV measures: Perceived Stress and 5-minute Mean Inter-Beat-Interval (IBI), r = -0.217*; Perceived stress and 5min SDNN, r = -0.255* and Perceived stress and Ln 5min RMSSD, r = -0.282**. Secondly, significant negative correlations were found between age and the HRV measures: 1- minute SDNN (r = -.235, p < 0.01); 5-minute SDNN (r = -.290, p < 0.01); 5-minute RMSSD (r = - .395, p < 0.01); Total Power (r = -.272, p < 0.05); Very Low Frequency (r = -.215, p < 0.05) and High Frequency (r = -.402, p < 0.01). Thirdly, significant negative correlation was found between Normalized Coherence and Relational Tension (r = -.222, p < 0.05). Additionally, significant positive correlations were found between Emotional Stress and the Mean Heart Rate Range (MHRR), r = 0.216* and between Intention to Quit and 5-minute Ln Very Low Frequency (VLF), r = 0.234*. The research shows promising results and future studies should continue to tap into HRV as an objective measure of mental health and workplace stress.

Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aileen Pidgeon photo
Biography:

Aileen Pidgeon, PhD (Clin) is an Assistant Professor Psychology at Bond University, co-Chair 4th Year Bond Psychology Programs, co-Director of the Mindfulness Resilience Wellness Centre and a board registered Clinical Psychologist. Dr Pidgeon's widely published research identifies innovative ways to reveal the full transformative potential of mindfulness training. In recent years, the main focus of Dr Pidgeon’s research is determining the optimal ways to integrate mindfulness into universities to improve psychological well-being and resilience in university students. At Bond University, Dr Pidgeon has led a research team to develop the evidence-based Mindfulness Awareness Resilience Skills Training (MARST) program, which includes a mental health application. She also designs and teaches research-based mindfulness retreats and workshops on the science and practice of mindfulness. She has also led training, workshops and retreats to promote the psychological health and wellbeing in the community. Dr Pidgeon sits on a number of boards and advisory groups in the field of education and research.

 

Abstract:

For over a decade, the psychological treatment of mental health issues has been undergoing a fundamental change. This change has been largely driven by the continued significant unmet need for mental health services and the availability of digital technology such as the internet and mobile devices. Individuals around the world are becoming increasingly dependent on the internet to obtain information and interact with services, due to flexibility, convenience, choice, cost and time savings. This dependence is becoming more evident as individuals seeking mental health information and support report preferring to access services online rather than face-to-face services. The field of mobile mental health (“m-Health”) is evolving rapidly with an unprecedented growth of psychological tools on the market including preventive and therapeutic interventions. M-Health applications offer the opportunity for mental healthcare delivery anytime and anywhere overcoming geographical, time based organizational barriers with low and affordable costs. M-Health applications can be used as a bridge between face-to-face therapy sessions, improve adherence to out of therapy activities while promoting patient autonomy. Given the ever increasing demands and limited supply of mental health services, coupled with barriers to care including a patient’s desire for anonymity, indirect financial costs and impaired access to mental health services, the use of apps could promote mental health service efficiency as well as supporting the mental health system to achieve the promise of providing equal access for equal need. The challenge that psychology faces with the rapid increase of m-health applications is the availability of low-quality applications with a lack of an underlying evidence base, a lack of scientific credibility and limited clinical effectiveness. M-health application designers are rarely clinical or counselling psychologists and if they were, there would be better accuracy of the content with evidence to support the efficacy of the application. The barriers for psychologists designing m-health applications are typically a lack of technical skills and time. This paper will discuss the growing need for clinical and counselling psychologists to shift their philosophy—from seeing what happens— to a prioritisation of designing and evaluating m-health applications in the provision of high quality clinical services to patients.  

Keynote Forum

Olga Bogdashina

International Autism Institute, United Kingdom

Keynote: A Reconstruction of the Sensory World of Autism

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Conference Series Clinical Psychologists 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Olga Bogdashina photo
Biography:

Olga Bogdashina, Ph.D. (linguistics), MSc (Psychology), MA (Teaching methods) MA Ed (Autism), Honorary Professor, Honorary Doctor, KSPU, Co-founder of the International Autism Institute, and Programme Leader (Autism courses), Chief Research Fellow and Lecturer at the International Autism Institute, KSPU; Visiting lecturer in Autism Studies, co-founder of the International Consortium of Autism Institutes, Author of nine books (some are translated into 13 languages) that reflect her specific interest in autism research sensory perception, cognitive functioning, communication and language development in autism, and spirituality in autism – reflected in the books, including: - Sensory perceptual Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Different sensory experiences – different perceptual worlds (2016). 2nd (revised) edition, London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers; - Communication Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Do we speak the same language?. London: JKP; - Theory of Mind and the Triad of Perspectives on Autism and Asperger Syndrome: A view from the bridge. London: JKP; - Autism and the Edges of the Known World: Sensitivities, Language and Constructed Reality London: JKP. - Autism and Spirituality: Psyche, Self and Spirit in People on the Autism Spectrum. London: JKP. Olga teaches and lectures in the UK, Europe, & Mexico. She has a son (30) with classic autism and a daughter (27) with Asperger syndrome.

Abstract:

The real world and the perceived world (i.e., our mental image of the world) differ. Though we live in the same physical world and deal with the same ‘raw material’, differences in sensory functioning create invisible walls between autistic and non-autistic people. The metaphorical descriptions of children and adults with autism, such as ‘aliens’, ‘Martians’ - become factual! They do live in a different world! The same stimuli look, sound, feel, smell differently for them. When we want to show our love and affection by hugging the child, he pulls away as the pain from the touch is unbearable. So what is our interpretation? - ‘He doesn’t love me.” We are often ‘deaf’ to the sounds our child cannot tolerate (for instance, sounds of fans working, kettle boiling). We are ‘blind’ to a 60-cycle flickering of fluorescent lights that makes the room pulsate on and off. Just because we are ‘deaf/blind/dumb, etc.’ to the stimuli our little ‘aliens’ perceive with extreme acuteness, we describe their behaviours as bizarre, odd, inappropriate. However, as the systems work differently their responses to sensory stimuli are ‘normal’ (from autistic point of view), though different and unconventional for us, living in a parallel world.

As some sensory differences are present in all individuals with autism it would benefit parents of autistic children and professionals working with them to become more knowledgeable about the sensory perceptual problems they experience and possible ways to help them. Autistic children literally live in a parallel (differently constructed) world and are often misunderstood (= mistreated). Many behaviours that interfere with learning and social interaction are, in fact, protective or sensory defensive responses of the child to ‘sensory pollution’ in the environment.

It is crucial to understand how the qualitative differences of sensory perception associated with autism affect each particular child. What is intolerable about the child’s behaviour is that it seems meaningless. If we can understand the reason for this behaviour it doesn’t seem strange or disturbing any more. This brings acceptance and respect for the autistic person’s efforts to ‘make sense’ of the world.

As all the senses are integrated, the deficiency in one may lead to disturbances in the other(s). It is, therefore, necessary to find out which sense(s) and to what extent is deficient, and which senses can ‘be relied on’.

The environment may either speed up the development or hinder it. In order to help them, we need to know how the senses of each individual work and what (voluntary and involuntary) strategies each individual has acquired to function in the environment. This reconstruction of the sensory world of autism will give us some ideas of the way autistic people perceive the world and will make non-autistics understand that the way they see the environment is not necessarily the only way to see it.

Besides, better understanding of sensory processing in autism will assist in improving diag­nostic instruments (including diagnosis in very young children) and distinguishing sensory perceptual subtypes of autis­tic individuals and provide appropri­ate choices of help needed by each particular individual.

  • Clinical Psychology

Session Introduction

Asma Perveen

Sultan Idris Education University,Malaysia

Title: Life Style Behavior as Contributing Factors of Depression Among University Students
Speaker
Biography:

Asma Perveen has completed her PhD from Karachi University, Pakistan in 2014. she has great expreience in clinical mental health . presenatly she is working with Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia as senior lecturer and practising in different clinical setting

Abstract:

This study was proposed to evaluate and understand student’s life style behaviors as contributing factors of depression. Life style is very significant to predict mental and physical health. This study  highlighted the importance of life style behavior as predicating factors of depression. National Institute of mental health (2017) revealed that majority of students have depression and unhealthy life style. Students now a days having challenging life style and having maladaptive behavior to handle stressors which eventually drain their productive skills to be active and healthy. Research design was survey method, students (N=300) were selected through randomly sampling from different faculties and departments of University Pendidikan Sultan Idris. Structured questionnaire were used to assess the demographic information. Physical health status, life style behaviors, including diet, physical activity, study time, social interaction, gadgets usage, financial status, shopping behavior and sleep pattern were measured by using Lifestyle Behavior Questionnaire, self-reported psychological distress was measured by ( General health Questionnaire). Depression was assessed by using Beck depression inventory. Results highlighted the importance of life style behavior and depressive symptoms among students. This studyl help students and academician to increase their understanding about healthy life style behavior among students. Study results results are useful to enhance students healthy life style to promote healthy mental health.

Speaker
Biography:

Soni Jaiswal has completed her post-graduation in Clinical Psychology in 2014 from Banaras Hindu University (BHU) and M.Phil in Clinical Psychology in 2017. She is working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Clinical Psychology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow Campus, India.

Abstract:

Persons with schizophrenia are commonly found having deficits in cognitive functions. The present study was designed to develop a cognitive remediation (CR) module targeting cognitive functions and assess the efficacy of same in persons with schizophrenia. Twelve persons diagnosed with schizophrenia were included in the study. Participants were divided into intervention group (N=6) and treatment as usual (TAU) group (N=6). They were assessed on Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Tower of London (TOL) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Participants of both the groups were matched on MMSE. Intervention group underwent 16 hours of CR spaced over a period of 1 month along with the routine treatment. Post-assessment were done for both the groups after 1 month. Data analysis was done through Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test and Mann-Whitney U Test. Intervention group was significantly better than TAU group on MMSE after one month. Per-post analysis revealed significant gain in certain domains of TOL and WCST for intervention group. In conclusion, persons with schizophrenia do benefit from CR. Findings suggest that the designed module is effective in improving cognitive deficits; hence it can be included as a part of regular treatment regime for persons with schizophrenia. However more future studies with larger sample sizes are required to generalize the findings.

Speaker
Biography:

Faith completed a Master of Science in Clinical Psychology at Makerere University Kampala. She is clinical psychologist that specializes in marginalized groups of people. Her recent work involves cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with refugees from South Sudan, war and torture victims and the LGBTQ community. Faith has a passion for research in depressive disorders and ethical issues in therapy. She is an advocate for the inclusion harm reduction skills in mental health and has written about practicing empathy in harm reduction.

 

Abstract:

Prenatal depression is one of the most common adverse outcomes of conceiving among expectant women. In Uganda, prenatal depression receives little attention with the only research stretching back in 1972, the prevalence of depression during pregnancy was found to be 16%. Prevalence rates in Uganda may be highly influenced by cultural attitudes because most people in Uganda are conservative in nature and may not often report prenatal depression, which influences the available data on the prevalence of antenatal depression. Often times, prenatal depression is undiagnosed and untreated which translates into deleterious consequences for the pregnant woman, significant others and the yet to be born child. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of prenatal depression among expectant women in Kampala. A sample of 223 prenatal women in Kampala aged between 18 and 45 years were selected using purposive sampling. A correlation research design with a quantitative approach was used as well as an interviews schedule to get the data. The results obtained showed that the likelihood of prenatal depression was higher among women of low social economic status, especially if their social support levels were low, and if their emotional or psychological well-being was affected by their intimate partner. Prenatal depression was found to have a rate of 15.7%. Based on the high prevalence rate of depression, it is necessary to organize workshops to educate pregnant women not only about prenatal depression but also on how to address social and economic needs that could potentially influence the occurrence of prenatal depression. This will reduce the knowledge gap that exists among pregnant women concerning their symptoms and, will improve the help-seeking behavior among pregnant women when they are faced with problems as outcome result of prenatal depression.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Mohammad Ayoob Lone has completed his PhD in Health Psychology and he is currently working as Assistant Professor at Department of Clinical Neuroscience, College of Medicine, and King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. He has published more than 20 papers in national and international Journals in the field of mental health.

Abstract:

Background: Medical education is challenging, as medical students are experiencing varied stressors, which affect their academic performance and quality of life. Previous research reported that coping strategies decrease the level of stress and improves the quality of life among medical students.

Aim: This study was designed to identify the role of coping strategies in quality of life among undergraduate medical students.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 196 (male =106, females = 96) undergraduate medical students in King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia. Quality of life was assessed by SF-12 (Ware, Kosinski, & Keller, 1996). The validated Brief COPE inventory was used to assess coping strategies (Carver et al., 1989).

Result: The results show a significant relationship between coping strategies and quality of life. The findings of the study revealed that substance abuse, self-blame, religion coping, venting, instrument support coping, humor and planning coping were found significant predictors of quality of life among medical students.

Conclusion: The findings point towards the crucial need for stress management programs in medical colleges. Though students used both problem coping and emotional coping, the evident role of emotional coping in increasing health problems warrants the need for coping skills training. Research on effectiveness of such programs in Saudi Arabia needs to be improved.

  • Methods of Clinical Psychology
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Fujisaki has completed her Ph.D. of Medicine from Tokyo Medical and Dental University and Master of Psychology from Keio University, and has a licensed clinical psychologist in Japan. She is a professor of Tokushima Bunri University. She has practiced meditation and yoga since her childhood and taught them for more than ten years. She has published many books about meditation and AEON-HO.

Abstract:

AEON-HO (Aeon method) is a Japanese psycho-therapy which consits mainly of Naikan therapy and mindfulness, and “AE” means love, “ON” means gratitude, and “HO” menas method in Japanese. Naikan therapy and mindfulness are different psychotherapies but both of them are originally from budism ascetic practices.

Naikan therapy was produced by Ishin Yoshimoto who was a Japanese budism monk and has been provided at psychiatric clinics, a correctional institutions, educational schools and business enterprises since 1960s. In Naikan therapy, the cliants are suggested to introspect themthelves’ life evens and relationships with close people like mother, father, brothers and sisters, partner, friends, colleagues and so on by using Naikan-three-clauses since their childhood. Many of the participants feel more love and gratitude with the close people and even with their own lives after taking the Naikan therapy program than before. There are some mindfulness therapies such as Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Both of them have efficacy to accelerate decentration and reduce relapse or recurrence of major depressive disorder. Naikan therapy is more psychodynamic, while mindfulness is more coping therapy. Therefore, they are expected to compliment each other’s deficiencies.

In this study, the participants had taken an eight weeks program of AEON-HO. The evidence suggests that AEON-HO is beneficial not only for depression but also for attachment styles and self-actualization. 

  • Counseling Psychology

Session Introduction

Neha Sharma

NMP Medical Research Institute, India

Title: Brief physician counselling for distressed young students: a randomized controlled trial
Speaker
Biography:

Neha Sharma is the director of Warwick Research Services, UK and   She is also Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the International Research Initiative on India, China, Europe and Africa. Dr. Sharma has over 70 research articles and has been invited to speak at numerous national and international conferences. She has received many honors and awards including young scientist award and scientific excellence award. Dr Sharma has an international reputation in the field of the health and social care developing resources and practice for better health care.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The literature has evidence that the stress and peer pressure negatively impact students, leading to increased depression, psychological distress and suicide. Mostly young students in India find it hard to confide in parents, teachers or friends expressing their emotions. Physicians can be first contact identifying risk behaviour and symptoms of depression and psychological distress. To address this, the current study examined the effects of a short-counselling by physicians on young students.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of brief physician advice in reducing depression, suicidal thoughts and related harm in students.

METHOD: A randomized, controlled clinical trial with 12-month follow-up conducted in two health clinics in Rajasthan, India. Of the 567 students screened for high-risk emotional distress, depression and suicidal behaviour, 218 student meeting inclusion criteria were randomized into a control (n = 109) or intervention (n = 109) group. Ninety-six percent of students participated in the follow-up procedures. The intervention consisted of two 15-minute counselling visits with physicians and two follow-up phone calls, and used motivational interview, diary cards, and take-home exercises. Control group was followed as usual during physician’s appointment addressing their health complaints.

RESULTS: No significant differences were found between groups at baseline on stress score, age, socioeconomic or health status, rates of depression, or measures of self-harm. At 3 months, the experimental subjects reduced depression score and suicidal thoughts compared to control group (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). There was no difference on the other outcome measures of interest, such as health care utilization, stress or coping with peer pressure.

 CONCLUSIONS: The study supports brief physician diagnosis and support in primary care-setting could help young students to deal with depression and psychological distress.

  • Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology
Speaker
Biography:

Saeid Sadeghi is Ph. D. Candidate in Clinical Psychology at Dept. of Clinical and Health Psychology in University of  Shahid Beheshti, Tehran, Iran.. He has published more than 16 papers in reputed journals. Also, he is tranlater of 3 books in Persian and author of one book in child and adolescent psychological health.

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of this study is evaluate the effectiveness of social skills training on social skills and behavior problems in adolescents with High-Functioning ASD. Method: This study method is quasi-experimental with pre-test and post-test with follow-up and without the control group. By using the judgment sampling two groups of 6 people of adolescents H-F ASD choice and participat in interventions meetings (10 sessions of 90 minutes, two sessions per-week) and in three phases of pre, post and follow-up by using the Social Skills Rating Scale Parent Form (Gresham & Elliott, 1990), which has two subscales (social skills and behavior problems) were evaluated. Results: Analysis of variance with repeated measures to evaluate the effectiveness of social skills training interventions show that participation in the sessions led to a significant improvment in participants' social skills, cooperation, assertiveness, responsibility and self-control, but not significantly decreased the participants' behavior problems. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that social skills training could improve the social skills of adolescents with H-F ASD, thus Social skills training for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder have recommended but to reduce behavioral problems additional studies to identify effective interventions methods recommended.

Key words: social skills, behavioral problems, adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder

  • Antipsychotics and Psychoactive Medication
Speaker
Biography:

A Vishal has completed his MD psychiatry at the age of 32 years from NTR university of health sciences Vijayawada. Now working as assistant professor of psychiatry at government medical college Nizamabad ,Telangana, India

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES : To assess the clinical global impression severity score (CGIS), with Long acting injectable antipsychotic drugs, in the first episode of schizophrenia at the time of admission and after therapy

BACKGROUND: Long acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIAPs) offered better adherence, tolerability, efficacy and better relief of clinical features due to the assured maintenance of therapeutic blood levels, with better relief of clinical features and greater reductions in relapse.

METHODS : Parameters were assessed at baseline CGIS- score at admission and at 3months intervals for 2yrs inpatients initiated with LAIAPs admitted at Nizamabad

RESULTS: At 2 years treatment retention and reduction in Clinical Global Impression Severity scores were significantly higher with LAIAPs. Compared to the pre-switch period, LAIAPs patients had greater reductions in the number of hospitalizations at 2years.

CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that LAIAPs was associated with better treatment retention, greater improvement in clinical symptoms and functioning, and greater reduction in hospital stays and days in hospital inpatients with first episode schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS : Longacting injection antipsychotics, first episode schizophrenia Biography

  • Ananlysis, Assesment and Diagnosis

Session Introduction

Kalyani Gopal

American Psychological Association, United States

Title: Identification and Assessment of Victims of Human Trafficking
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kalyani Gopal, PhD, HSPP, Founder & President, SAFE Coalition for Human Rights, President-Elect, Illinois Psychological Association, Board of Directors, Society for Cl Psychology, American Psychological Association

Dr. Gopal is a keynote and international speaker and trainer on foster care and adoption, sex-trafficking, child sexual abuse, Autism and neurodevelopmental disorders, and psychopathology.  She has trained foster parents, adoptive parents, administrators, judges, FBI, police officers, attorneys, case managers, nonprofits, and clergy on issues related to infants, children, adolescents and adults.  She has coined the term "Displacement Trauma" to describe the complex trauma caused by frequent disruptions of attachment bonds. She is the bestselling author of "The Supportive Foster Parent", "Foster Parenting Step-by-Step", the grief and loss workbook "In My Heart" and workbook on child sexual abuse and co-editor of the upcoming Springer publication, “Sex Trafficking: Feminist and Transnational Perspectives.” She is on the boards of the Lake County Child Protection Team and Lake County Child Fatality Team, serves as the Chair for the Illinois Psychological Association’s Working Committee on Hate and Harassment, and the Chair of the IPA Women’s Section, served as President of Section IV, Division 12, American Psychological Association (2012-2014), and is currently serving on the Board of Directors, Society of Clinical Psychology, American Psychological Association.  She is the President of Mid-America Psychological and Counseling Services, PC and manages seven mental health clinics in Indiana, Illinois, and Florida. Her nonprofit organization, Safe Coalition for Human Rights hosted SAFE 2014 in Chicago, SAFE 2016 in DC/VA, and will be hosting SAFE 2018 at the Palmer House, Hilton, Chicago, USA on Sept 2-5, 2018, bringing together organizations from around the globe working ceaselessly to form collaborative national and international coalitions from rescue to rehabilitation of victims of human trafficking and violations of human rights. In recognition of her work, Dr Gopal was awarded the Lake County Award for Excellence in 2004 and Indiana Attorney General’s Voices for Victims Award in 2015.

Abstract:

Human Trafficking has grown from a 9.5 billion dollar international crime to150 billion dollars in a short span of 13 years. Research has shown that the main reason victims are not identified in therapists’ offices is due to the lack of awareness of the severity of the problem and lack of training in identification of victims by therapists and clinicians. Often they are diagnosed as ODD, Bipolar Disorder and described as being out of control, defiant, or dysregulated. As a result, the core problem and issues are not identified. This keynote presentation will focus on the above and train therapists in tools to identify and assess victims effectively.